Tag: events

Event: Weber / Simmel antagonisms, staged dialogues

10-11 December at the University of Edinburgh.

A conference organized by the Max Weber Group of the British Sociological Association & Edinburgh Sociology.

Keynote dialogues

Money

Nigel Dodd (LSE) as Simmel
Geoff Ingham (Cambridge) as Weber

Capitalism

Scott Lash (Goldsmiths) as Simmel
Uta Gerhardt (Heidelberg) as Weber

Verstehen and writing

Rosalie Dion (Montréal) as Simmel
Barbara Thériault (Montréal) as Weber

Conflict

Thomas Kemple (UBC) as Simmel
Austin Harrington (Leeds) as Weber

Philosophical & political stance

Olli Pyyhtinen (Tampere) as Simmel
Carlos Frade (Salford) as Weber

(Not clear whether there are still places: it says registration closed in November, but it also says it’s still open).

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Lecture: Ha-Joon Chang, What Can Economics Learn From Science Fiction?

Goldsmiths has launched the interdisciplinary  Political Economy Research Centre. In the first public lecture for PERC, Professor Ha-Joon Chang asks, “What Can Economics Learn From Science Fiction?” Topics Chang touches on include neoclassical economics as science fiction, the political construction of markets, alternate history and the US Civil War, Orwell and dystopian technological progress, Vonnegut and post-scarcity, child labour, cultural and historical materialism, and the invention of industrial time. In fact, Chang suggests how both fields can learn from each other. The lecture is available as a podcast.

Exhibition / Interview: Image of Finance, 1700 to the Present

‘Show Me the Money: The Image of Finance, 1700 to the Present’ is a touring exhibition dedicated to mapping everything financial. It features images, illustrations, and visual media alike to give the visitor an altogether different and poignant impression of a little thing we call ‘money’.  With the exhibition currently in the middle of its four-stop tour, USSO interviews Dr Paul Crosthwaite, one of the three academic investigators on the project.

“Meet the Curator: ‘Show Me the Money: The Image of Finance, 1700 to the Present'” at US Studies Online.